U.S. CBRN & HAZMAT Incidents Decontamination Technologies & Markets – 2010-2014

Description

Publication: 02/2009, Pages: 200, Tables & Figures: 74

$0.8 Billion in 2009 to $1.45 Billion by 2014.

U.S. CBRN & HAZMAT Incidents Decontamination Technologies & Markets – 2010-2014

This report describes existing and pipeline technologies, as well as current markets and, business and funding opportunities related to producing, using, and/or stockpiling Chemical, Biological, Nuclear and Radiological (CBRN) decontamination equipment and materials.

The report’s highlights include:
  • The Obama administration is committed to accelerating the spending on CBRN mitigation programs. The “2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act” alone provides funding for many CBRN mitigation goals. It includes over $2.7 billion for procurement and advanced development of CBRN and pandemic influenza medical countermeasures.
  • The economic slowdown is forecasted to accelerate federal funding for the decontamination industry, as indicated by President Obama’s stimulus package, which includes provisions relating to job creation, counter-WMD terror and environment issues.
  • Preparing for the aftermath of a CBRN event is a high priority mission of U.S. HLS policy and decision makers. Accordingly to the Homeland Security Threat Assessment for the years 2010-2014, CBRN attacks are considered the most dangerous threats facing the U.S.
The research asks and answers, among others, the following questions:
  • What are the main drivers and inhibitors relevant to existing decontamination technologies and markets?
  • What are the business opportunities that arise from the distance between existing technologies and products and the technologies and products required to provide needed protection?
  • Who, in government, is involved with decontamination R&D, and what is the funding opportunities horizon through the end of the decade and the start of the next decade?
The systems reviewed in this report include the following modalities:
  • Contamination detection systems
  • Equipment, buildings and environmental decontamination systems (for sensitive and non-sensitive equipment and buildings, ground, infrastructure and environment decontamination, fumigation systems, foam/gel sprayers) – systems for decontamination of all contaminated objects, except people
  • People decontamination systems
Table of Contents Table of Contents
Download TOC as PDF
1. Scope
1.1. Definition of Decontamination
1.2. Scope of This Report
1.3. Basic Assumptions
1.3.1. General
1.3.2. Stockpiling Decontamination Means
1.3.3. Possible Scenario Analysis
1.4. Methodology
1.4.1. Research Methods
1.4.2. Report Structure
1.5. Who is This Report For?
2. Executive Summary
2.1. Main Conclusions
2.2. CBRN Terrorism
2.3. Post event CBRN & HAZMAT Decontaminating Process
2.4. The Decontamination Industry
2.5. Decontamination Market
2.6. Technological Challenges
2.7. Federal HLS Decontamination R&D Funding
3. Decontamination Market – Drivers
4. Decontamination Market – Inhibitors
5. The Obama Administration CBRN Terror Mitigation Strategy
6. Decontamination: Technological Requirements
6.1. The Problem
6.2. The Decontamination Process
6.2.1. Contaminant Identification
6.2.2. Sample Characterization
6.2.3. Isolation of Contaminated Area
6.2.4. Design of Decontamination Strategy
6.2.5. Decontamination
6.2.6. Clearance Sampling
6.3. Building & People Decontamination
6.3.1. People Decontamination
6.3.2. Buildings Decontamination
6.4. Performance Challenges
6.4.1. Challenge 1
6.4.2. Challenge 2
6.4.3. Challenge 3
6.4.4. Challenge 4
6.4.5. Challenge 5
6.4.6. Challenge 6
6.4.7. Challenge 7
6.5. Technologies Overview
6.6. Physics-Based Decontamination Core Technologies
6.6.1. Sorbents
6.6.2. Solvent-Wash
6.6.3. High-Pressure Methods
6.6.4. Thermal Methods
6.7. Chemistry-Based Decontamination Core Technologies
6.7.1. Oxidizing Agents
6.7.2. Strong Bases
6.7.3. Surfactants
6.7.4. Microemulsions
6.8. Biology-Based Technologies
6.8.1. Bacterial Decontamination Agents
6.8.2. Enzymatic Systems
6.9. Decontamination System Configurations
6.9.1. Application 1 – People Decontamination Systems
6.9.2. Application 2 – Equipment Decontamination Systems
6.10. Indoor Heavy Equipment Decontamination
6.10.1. Application 3 – Building and Infrastructure Decontamination Systems
6.11. New Technologies – Drivers
6.12. New Technologies – Inhibitors
7. Decontamination Equipment Market Outlook – 2010–2014
7.1. Scope, Assumptions and Overview
7.2. U.S. Incidents Decontamination Equipment Sales & Service Outlook – 2010–2014
7.3. Decontamination Equipment Market Forecast – 2010–2014
7.4. Decontamination Equipment Service & Upgrade Market – 2010–2014
8. Business Opportunities – 2010-2014
8.1. Historical Perspective: A Market Waiting for Transition
8.1.1. HLS Decontamination Strategy Outlook
8.1.2. Factors Affecting Decontamination Systems Business Opportunities
8.2. Business Opportunities for Decontamination Systems
8.2.1. Business Opportunity 1
8.2.2. Business Opportunity 2
8.2.3. Business Opportunity 3
8.2.4. Business Opportunity 4
8.2.5. Business Opportunity 5
8.2.6. Business Opportunity 6
8.2.7. Business Opportunity 7
8.3. Radiological Decontamination Technologies
8.3.1. Business Opportunity 8
8.3.2. Business Opportunity 9
8.3.3. Business Opportunity 10
8.3.4. Business Opportunity 11
8.3.5. Business Opportunity 12
8.4. Chemical-Biological Decontamination Technologies and Business Opportunities
8.4.1. Business Opportunity 13
8.4.2. Business Opportunity 14
8.4.3. Business Opportunity 15
8.4.4. Business Opportunity 16
8.4.5. Business Opportunity 17
8.4.6. Business Opportunity 18
8.4.7. Business Opportunity 19
8.4.8. Business Opportunity 20
8.4.9. Business Opportunity 21
8.5. Contamination Simulation Algorithms
8.5.1. Business Opportunity 22
9. Decontamination – Federal HLS R&D Programs and Funding Opportunities Forecast – 2010-2014
9.1. Summary & Outlook
9.2. Decontamination –Federal HLS R&D Funding Opportunities by Major Departments Forecast – 2010-2014
9.2.1. EPA Decontamination R&D
9.2.2. DOD – Decontamination HLS R&D
9.2.3. DHS – Decontamination HLS R&D
9.2.4. DOE – Decontamination R&D
9.2.5. TSWG – Decontamination R&D
9.3. Decontamination –Federal HLS R&D Funding Opportunities Forecast – 2010-2014
9.4. Decontamination – Federal HLS R&D Funding Opportunities Drivers
9.5. Decontamination – Federal HLS R&D Funding Opportunities Inhibitors
9.6. DHS – Decontamination HLS R&D Programs
9.6.1. Response and Recovery
9.6.2. Decontamination of Porous Surfaces after a Radiological Attack
9.6.3. Expedient Mitigation of a Radiological Release
9.7. DARPA (DOD) – Decontamination HLS R&D Programs
9.7.1. Immune Buildings
9.7.2. External Protection
9.8. CBDP (DOD) – Decontamination HLS R&D Programs
9.8.1. Project CB1 – Decontamination
9.8.2. Project CB2 – Decontamination
9.8.3. Project CB3 Biological Defense (ATD) – Decontamination
9.9. ARMY (DOD) – Decontamination HLS R&D Programs
9.9.1. Environmental Quality Technology
9.10. DOE – Decontamination HLS R&D Programs
9.10.1. Environmental Remediation Science Research
9.11. EPA – Decontamination HLS R&D Programs
9.11.1. Water Infrastructure Decontamination
9.11.2. Threat and Consequence Assessment
9.11.3. Nonstandard Methods
9.11.4. Decontamination for Buildings, Large Structures, and Outdoor Areas
9.11.5. Toxicity, Infectivity, and Mechanism of Action
9.12. TSWG – Decontamination HLS R&D Programs
9.12.1. Statistical Design Tool for Sampling Contaminated Buildings
9.12.2. Decontamination
10. Vendors and Products
10.1. Decontamination systems- Vendors and Products
10.2. Other Decontamination Equipment, Kits etc
11. Guidelines for Equipment Procurement
11.1. Equipment Selection Factors
11.2. Equipment Evaluation
11.2.1. Commercial Decontaminants
11.2.2. Decontamination Delivery Systems (Liquids)
11.2.3. Decontamination Delivery Systems (Gaseous)
11.2.4. Decontamination Shower Systems
11.2.5. Decontamination Shower Hardware
11.2.6. Decontamination Kits
11.2.7. Decontamination Containment Items
11.2.8. Decontamination Support Equipment
12. Appendix A: CBRN Terror
12.1. Biological Terror
12.1.1. Bio-Weapons – Historical Perspective
12.1.2. Biological Terror – Bacterial Agents
12.1.3. Biological Terror – Viral Agents
12.1.4. Biological Terror – Rickettsiae Agents
12.1.5. Biological Terror – Toxins
12.2. Nuclear-Radiological Terror
12.2.1. How Real is the Nuclear Threat?
12.2.2. Nuclear Terror
12.2.3. Radiological Dispersal Devices (RDD)
12.3. Chemical Terror
12.3.1. Nerve Agents
12.3.2. Blister Agents
13. Appendix B: Patent Review
13.1. Scope
13.2. Decontamination Technology Patents
14. Appendix C - Decontamination Legal Issues
14.1. International Legislation/Agreements
14.1.1. The Nuclear Weapons Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) – 1970
14.1.2. The Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BTWC) – 1972
14.1.3. Convention for the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material – 1987
14.1.4. Chemicals Weapons Convention – 1992
14.2. U.S. Legislation
14.2.1. U.S. Code Title 50, Chapter 40 – Defense Against Weapons of Mass Destruction
14.2.2. Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) – 1996
14.2.3. Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act for Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States – 2001
14.2.4. Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act – 2002
14.2.5. Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Act (PAHPA), 2006
14.2.6.  Homeland Security Presidential Directive 21
Figures/Tables Tables
Table 1 U.S. CBRN & HAZMAT Incidents Decontamination Equipment & Systems Service Market [$ Million] - 2010-2014
Table 2 U.S. CBRN & HAZMAT Incidents Decontamination Equipment & Service Market [$ Million] by Modality - 2010-2014
Table 3 Decontamination –Federal HLS R&D Funding Forecast by Major Departments [$ Million] – 2010-2014
Table 4 Decontamination – Federal HLS R&D Funding Forecast by Major Departments [%] – 2010-2014
Table 5 U.S. CBRN & HAZMAT Incidents Decontamination Equipment Sales & Service Market [$ Million] by Modality - 2010-2014
Table 6 U.S. CBRN & HAZMAT Incidents Decontamination Equipment Market [$ Million] by Modality - 2010-2014
Table 7 U.S. CBRN & HAZMAT Incidents Decontamination Equipment Market Shares [%] by Modality - 2010-2014
Table 8 U.S. CBRN & HAZMAT Incidents Decontamination Equipment Service & Upgrade Market [$ Million] by Modality - 2010-2014
Table 9 Decontamination –Federal HLS R&D Funding Opportunities Forecast by Sector [$ Million] – 2010-2014
Table 10 Decontamination –Federal HLS R&D Funding Opportunities Forecast Share by Sector [%] – 2010-2014
Table 11 Equipment Selection Factors and Criteria
Table 12 Commercial Decontaminants Analysis
Table 13 Decontamination Delivery Systems (liquids) Analysis
Table 14 Decontamination Delivery Systems (gaseous) Analysis.
Table 15 Decontamination Shower Systems Analysis
Table 16 Decontamination Shower Hardware Analysis
Table 17 Decontamination Kits Analysis
Table 18 Decontamination Containment Items Analysis
Table 19 Decontamination Support Equipment Analysis
Table 20 Physical and Chemical Properties of Common Nerve Agents
Table 21  Physical and Chemical Properties of Common Blister Agents

Figures
Figure 1 The Bio Attack Response Timeline
Figure 2 CBRN Identification Roadmap
Figure 3 U.S. CBRN & HAZMAT Incidents Decontamination Equipment & Systems Service Market [$ Million] - 2010-2014
Figure 4 U.S. CBRN & HAZMAT Incidents Decontamination Equipment & Systems Service Market [$ Million] - 2009 & 2014
Figure 5 Comparison in Weight of Pathogens between BW Agents and CW Agents [mg]
Figure 6 Closed Area (e.g., building) Decontamination Boundaries
Figure 7 Open Area Decontamination Boundaries
Figure 8 Decontamination Corridor
Figure 9 Basic Decontamination Process
Figure 10 A Detailed Decontamination Process
Figure 11 CBRN Scene – Decontamination Diagram
Figure 12 Mass CBRN Casualty Decontamination Triage Decision Tree
Figure 13 The FBI CBRN & HAZMAT Response Teams Deployment Map
Figure 14 The Federal Bio-Chem Capstone IPT Structure
Figure 15 Decontamination Core Technologies Overview
Figure 16 Skin Decontaminate Lotion, Anachemia Canada, Inc.
Figure 17 Decontamination Kit, Personal No. 2, Mark 1, Richmond Packaging (U.K.) Ltd.
Figure 18 Portaflex Decontamination Shower System, High Safety Showers USA
Figure 19 K4-05 High Purity, Applied Surface Technologies, USE
Figure 20 Decocontain 3000, Karcher, Germany
Figure 21 U.S. CBRN & HAZMAT Incidents Decontamination Equipment & Service Markets by Modalities [%] - 2009 & 2014
Figure 22 U.S. CBRN & HAZMAT Incidents Decontamination Equipment Market [$ Million] by Modality - 2010-2014
Figure 23 U.S. CBRN & HAZMAT Incidents Decontamination Equipment Market by Modality Share [%] - 2009, 2011, 2014
Figure 24 U.S. CBRN & HAZMAT Incidents Decontamination Equipment Service & Upgrade Market [$ Million] by Modality - 2010-2014
Figure 25 U.S. Service & Upgrade Market [$ Million] by Modality, 2009, 2011 &2014
Figure 26 Schematic of the ISOTRON System
Figure 27 Decontamination – Federal HLS R&D Funding Forecast by Major Departments [$ Million] – 2010-2014
Figure 28 Decontamination –Federal HLS R&D Funding Forecast by Major Departments Share [%] – 2008, 2011 & 2014
Figure 29 EPA – Decontamination HLS R&D Budget Forecast [$ Million] 2010-2014
Figure 30 DOD – Decontamination R&D Budget Forecast [$ Million] – 2010-2014
Figure 31 DHS – Decontamination R&D Budget Forecast [$ Million] – 2010-2014
Figure 32 DOE – Decontamination R&D Budget Forecast [$ Million] – 2010-2014
Figure 33 TSWG – Decontamination R&D Budget Forecast [$ Million] – 2010-2014
Figure 34 Decontamination –Federal HLS R&D Funding Opportunities Forecast by Sector [$ Million] – 2010-2014
Figure 35 Decontamination –Federal HLS R&D Funding Opportunities Forecast Share by Sector [%] – 2008, 2011 & 2014
Figure 36 Decontamination –Federal HLS R&D Private Sector Funding Opportunities Forecast [$ Million] – 2010-2014
Figure 37 Decontamination –Federal HLS R&D Academia Sector Funding Opportunities Forecast [$ Million] – 2010-2014
Figure 38 Decontamination –Federal HLS R&D Government Sector Funding Opportunities Forecast [$ Million] – 2010-2014
Figure 39 Categories of the Bio-threat Divides
Figure 40 The Spraying of Anthrax from Aum Shinrikyo's Headquarters June 1993
Figure 41 Anthrax Spores and Disease
Figure 42 Cholera Bacteria
Figure 43 Pneumonic Plague – The Disease
Figure 44 Tularemia – The Disease
Figure 45 Smallpox Virus and Disease
Figure 46 Ebola virus – Electron Microscopy Image
Figure 47 VEE – Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus in The Olfactory Mucosa of a Mouse
Figure 48 Q Fever
Figure 49 Typhus Microbe – Electron Microscopy Image
Figure 50 Castor Plant and Structure for the Ricin Toxin
Figure 51 The Dinoflagellate Alexandrium Tamarense and Structure of Saxitoxin
Figure 52 A Simulation of the Impact of the Explosion of a 500 Curie Co60 Dirty Bomb in Downtown Manhattan
Figure 53  Categories of the Chemical Divides
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